Around the Novahood

TRICK, NO TREAT:  KIDS’ PARTIES AS SUPERSPREADER EVENTS

According to Loudoun’s Health Department director, COVID cases in the county continue to climb, and the department is now tracking at least three outbreaks resulting from kids’ Halloween parties. He said these were among several recent outbreaks that were “preventable.” COVID-19 cases in Loudoun continue to grow; as of November 18, the 7-day rolling average of new cases was 65.7. So far Loudoun’s healthcare systems “are not yet stressed,” the director said, but he warned that winter weather—and its accompanying surge in respiratory diseases of all types—is not yet here.

Parents may be reluctant in denying children a Halloween treat or even attendance at a party. However, when such social pressure places children in danger, what is the sensible choice? Parents must be the grownups.

SELLING GUNS IS NOT A RIGHT

Pity the poor gun show sponsors, who with only 6 days’ notice had to cancel last weekend’s Chantilly gun show, one of the largest in the nation. After being told that tightened restrictions imposed by Gov. Ralph Northam due to COVID would limit the event to 250 people, organizers filed for an emergency injunction in Fairfax County Circuit Court. While saying he sympathized with the group’s expected loss of millions of dollars, the Fairfax judge ruled that “[T]o allow thousands of people to roam unchecked in the throes of of the worst pandemic in 100 years is not in the public interest.” Added Attorney General Mark Herring after the ruling, “This enormous gun show could have very quickly become a superspreader event and this win will help keep hundreds if not thousands of Virginians safe and healthy.”

What, you mean gun rights don’t override everything? So many disappointed Christmas givers.

THE SPY WHO CAME FROM GAINESVILLE

The Justice Department confirmed that an ex-Green Beret pleaded to conspiring with Russian intelligence operatives over 14 years providing national defense information. The Gainesville resident conspired with agents of a Russian intelligence service from December 1996 to January 2011, according to a news release issued last week. From 1996 to 2011, this individual visited Russia periodically to meet with Russian intelligence agents, was assigned a Russian code name, and shared information about fellow members of his Special Forces team, the release said.

The former military member served on active duty as an officer in the U.S. Army from 1998 to 2005, in chemical units before being selected for the U.S. Army Special Forces, which he was encouraged to join by his Russian agents. He achieved the rank of captain. 

Sentencing is scheduled on Feb. 26, 202 with a possible maximum penalty of life in prison.

Is it of any comfort that Vladimir Putin assured P45 that Russia did not interfere in the 2016 election? It may very well be that this admitted spy will be the subject of a prisoner exchange at some future date. Edward Snowden? 

 

 

 



Categories: coronavirus, crime and punishment, gun control, Issues, Local, pandemic, politics, State

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